);

Immigrants in the U.S. and Public Benefits: Understanding Public Charge

Many immigrants living in the United States are hesitant to use public benefits because they fear it will affect their immigration status. A lot of that fear comes from a rule known as public charge.

Neighborhood Legal Services of Los Angeles County is working to ensure the community is well informed about public charge so that families accesses the public benefits they need to stay healthy. We know that you may be worried — but the more we know about our rights, the stronger and healthier we are.

12.10.19 Update:

On October 11, the courts stopped changes to the new public charge rule from starting.

You may have heard that some courts that blocked the proposed public charge rule changed their minds and stopped blocking the rule. But, one court in New York is still blocking the proposed changes to the public charge rule. As long as the New York court continues their block, the public charge rule stays blocked for the whole country.

Do not panic. For now, the public charge rules in the U.S. have not changed. People should continue to use Medi-Cal, Section 8, Public Housing and CalFresh without fear.

Use this time to educate yourself about what this rule is, and how it may affect your community.

Please check in for updates.

NOTE: We have not been able to update the information on this page yet, so please ignore reference to changes after October 15. Thank you.

Frequently Ask Questions:

What is the Public Charge Test?

It is a test that immigration officials use to decide who they will give a visa to, who can renew certain temporary visas, and who can get Lawful Permanent Residency (LPR)—also known as a green card. It does not apply when a green card holder applies for citizenship. The test asks whether someone is likely to become dependent on the government in the future.

The public charge test is only used at some steps of the immigration process; it only is applied to some immigrants; and it only considers the use of some public benefits, not all! In reality, the use of public benefits affects very few immigrants.

Does the public charge test apply to all immigrants?

No! Many immigrant categories are NOT affected by the public charge test.

The public charge test doesn’t apply to the following immigrant categories:

  • Refugees and Asylees
  • T Visa (Trafficking)
  • U Visa (Crime Victim)
  • Special Immigrant Juveniles (SIJS)
  • VAWA recipients
  • DACA
  • Temporary Protected Status (TPS)
  • Cubans
  • Amerasians
  • Afghan & Iraqi Special Immigrants
  • NACARA
  • HRIFA
  • Lautenberg parolees

The rule also does not apply when these immigrants apply for a green card!

 

I already have a green card. Does the public charge test apply to me?

The Federal Government cannot cancel your green card just because you, your family, or children get public benefits.

The public charge test is not used when a green card holder (aka lawful permanent resident or LPR) applies to become a U.S. Citizen, a process known as “naturalization.” You cannot be denied citizenship for lawfully receiving benefits.

BUT: the Public Charge test may be applied to you if you leave the U.S. for more than 180 days. If you plan to leave the U.S. for more than 180 days, talk to an immigration attorney before you leave.

What if I’m undocumented? Does the public charge test apply to me?

If you are undocumented in the United States right now and are not applying to change your legal status, no immigration official is looking at you or your family’s use of public benefits. If you apply to change your immigration status (for example, if you apply for a family-based visa), then at that time, immigration officials may apply the public charge test.

If you think you may have a path to legal status in the future, you can speak to an attorney and make a decision then about your children’s uses of public benefits.

Also, your child’s use of benefits does not affect you. (See question #8 for more information).

If the public charge test does not apply to all immigrants, when does the public charge test get applied?

The public charge test is used by immigration officials to decide whether a person can come to the U.S. or if a person can get a green card (lawful permanent resident or “LPR” status) through a family-based petition, employment-based petition, or some specific other categories.

It is applied when an immigrant is outside of the U.S. and is requesting a visa to come visit or remain in the United States.

It is applied when an immigrant is already inside the U.S. and is requesting a green card (applying for adjustment of status) usually through a family-based or employment-based petition, or another specific category.

 

What public benefits will the immigration official look at to decide whether a person may become a public charge?

The public charge test only looks at whether you received certain benefits.

Up until October 15, 2019, the public charge test looks at whether an immigrant got any of these benefits:

  • Cash Assistance Program for Immigrants (CAPI)
  • Supplemental Security Income
  • CalWORKS (TANF)
  • General Relief
  • Long-term care in an institution at the government’s expense

After October 15, 2019, the public charge test looks at whether an immigrant go these benefits:

  • Cash Assistance Program for Immigrants (CAPI)
  • Supplemental Security Income
  • CalWORKS (TANF)
  • General Relief
  • Long-term care in an institution at the government’s expense
  • CalFresh (SNAP)
  • Public Housing
  • Medi-Cal (Medicaid), EXCEPT for emergency Medi-Cal, state funded Medi-Cal, Medi-Cal for children under age 21 and Medi-Cal for pregnant women up to 60 days post-partum

 

What public benefits do immigration officials NOT look at to decide whether a person may become a public charge?

Under the new public charge rule, many government-funded services are still safe to use and do not cause any immigration harm.

Medicare Part D Los-Income Subsidy
Emergency Medi-Cal
Health Center sliding fee programs
My Health LA
CHIP
Use of Medi-Cal by pregnant women
Use of Medi-Cal by children up until age 21
State funded benefits under PRUCOL
WIC
School Breakfast and Lunch
Child Care
Head Start
Public School
Foster Care Benefits
Food banks
Shelters
Earned Income Tax Credit
Low Income Tax Credit Housing
FEMA Assistance (Disaster Relief)
Student Loans
Veterans Benefits
Unemployment
Workers’ compensation
Retirement Benefits (any work insurance benefits)

Does my child’s use of public benefits affect me?

No. The public charge test looks at the benefits you use, not the benefits your children or other family members use. There is no reason to cancel your children’s benefits. If you have very low income, however, that is a negative factor in the public charge test.

 

Will my past use of Medi-Cal, CalFresh, Section 8 or Public Housing be used against me?

No. Newly added benefits to the Public Charge test, will only be considered if they are received after October 15, 2019.

Stay calm. You have time to speak to a trusted attorney (not a notario!) before dropping any benefits.

Can I get deported for using public benefits?

Very few people are deported based on public charge.

In order for the government to be able to deport someone based on the immigrant depending on public benefits, the government has to prove to an immigration judge:

  • The green card holder became a public charge within the 5 years of the date they became a green card holder, or within 5 years of the last time they came into the United States, and
  • They have become a public charge for reasons that existed before they became a green card holder

The government also has to prove to an immigration judge:

  • That state law imposes a legal requirement that the immigrant reimburse the government for the cost of the benefits they received,
  • That the immigrant received notice from the government that she or he had to pay the agency back within 5 years of the immigrant becoming a green card holder or within 5 years of the last time they came into the United States, and
  • That the immigrant failed to repay after government took legal action and won.
If I apply for benefits or if my children receive benefits, will the county give my information to immigration enforcement?

No. The information you share with the county is confidential, and can only be used to confirm eligibility for public benefits. The county does not share personal information with immigration enforcement.

The county does not share any information about family or household members who are not applying for benefits, and people in the household who are not applying for benefits do not need to share their personal information.

Is there anything I should do now if I am receiving government benefits?

If you receive any public benefits, you should be careful to report your income correctly and timely to avoid overpayments and potential fraud charges. Be aware of your Income Reporting Threshold (IRT) amount and report your income immediately if it reaches that amount, even if it’s in between your regular report dates. Being accused of fraud (not telling the truth about your situation in order to get more benefits) can affect your immigration options.

 

Still not sure if the Public Charge Rule will apply to your case? Take this test:

https://www.thelibreproject.org/public-charge.html#screeningtool

Learn more here: https://www.nilc.org/issues/economic-support/pubcharge/

You can also call our hotline for more information or a referral: 1-800-433-6251

If you are in LA County, you can also call the Office of Immigrant Affairs for a referral to an immigration attorney: 1-800-593-8222

If you have an organizational interest in a public charge training from Neighborhood Legal Services staff, please email publicchargeproject@nlsla.org

 

Actualización 16 de agosto, 2019

Muchos inmigrantes que viven en los Estados Unidos dudan en usar los beneficios públicos porque temen que esto afecte su estatus migratorio. Gran parte de ese miedo proviene de una regla conocida como carga pública.

El día 11 de octubre, los tribunales detuvieron los cambios a la nueva regla de carga pública para que esta regla no se llevara a cabo.  Las personas deben seguir usando Medi-Cal, Sección 8, Vivienda pública y CalFresh sin ningún temor.  Por favor, este pendiente de cualquier actualización, ya que estos casos judiciales aún están siendo peleados en la corte.

Aún no hemos podido actualizar la información en esta página, así que por favor ignore comentarios referentes a los cambios después del 15 de octubre.  Gracias.

Neighborhood Legal Services of LA County está trabajando para garantizar que la comunidad esté bien informada sobre la carga pública para que las familias consigan acceso a los beneficios públicos que necesitan para mantenerse saludables. Sabemos que usted puede estar preocupado, pero cuanto más sepamos acerca de nuestros derechos, más fuertes y saludables seremos.

Preguntas Frecuentes:

¿Qué es la prueba de carga pública?

Es una prueba que utilizan los funcionarios de inmigración para decidir a quién otorgarán una visa, quién puede renovar ciertas visas temporales y quién puede obtener la Residencia Permanente Legal (LPR), también conocida como tarjeta verde. Esto no se aplica cuando el titular de una tarjeta verde solicita la ciudadanía. La prueba considera si es probable que alguien se vuelva dependiente del gobierno en el futuro.

La prueba de carga pública solo se usa en algunos pasos del proceso de inmigración; solo se aplica a algunos inmigrantes; ¡y solo considera el uso de algunos beneficios públicos, no todos! En realidad, el uso de beneficios públicos afecta a muy pocos inmigrantes.

¿La prueba de cargo público se aplica a todos los inmigrantes?

No! Muchas de las categorías de inmigración NO están afectadas por la prueba de carga pública.

The public charge test doesn’t apply to the following immigrant categories:

  • Refugiados y Asilados
  • Visa T (Victima de Trata de personas)
  • Visa U (Victimas de Crimen)
  • Jóvenes Inmigrantes Especiales (SIJS)
  • Beneficiario de VAWA
  • DACA
  • Estatus de Protección Temporal (TPS)
  • Cubanos
  • Amerasiáticos
  • Inmigrantes Especiales de Afganistan & Iraq
  • NACARA
  • HRIFA
  • Lautenberg en libertad provisional

¡La regla tampoco aplica cuando estos inmigrantes aplican para la tarjeta verde!

¿Ya tengo una tarjeta verde. Aplica para mí la prueba de cargo público?

El Gobierno Federal, no puede cancelar su tarjeta verde solo por el hecho de que su familia, o hijos obtengan beneficios públicos.

La prueba de carga pública no se utiliza cuando el titular de una tarjeta verde (también conocido como residente permanente legal o LPR) aplica hacerse Ciudadado Estaunidense, un proceso conocido como “Naturalización”. A usted no se le puede negar la ciudadanía por recibir beneficios de manera legal.

PERO: La prueba de carga pública puede aplicarse a usted, si usted planea salir de los EE. UU. Por más de 180 días. Si planea abandonar los EE. UU. Durante más de 180 días, por lo tanto hable con un abogado de inmigración antes de salir del país.

¿Que sucede si soy indocumentado? Aplicaría a mí la prueba de carga pública?

Si en este momento usted no está documentado en los Estados Unidos y no está solicitando cambiar su estado legal, entonces, ningún funcionario de inmigración lo está observando sobre el uso de los beneficios públicos a usted ni a su familia. Si usted aplica para cambiar su estado de inmigración (por ejemplo, si solicita una visa basada en la familia), entonces es en ese momento, cuando los funcionarios de inmigración podrían aplicar la prueba de carga pública.

Si más adelante usted cree que puede tener una oportunidad hacia un estatus legal, usted puede hablar con un abogado y en ese momento debe tomar una decisión sobre el uso de los beneficios públicos que hacen sus hijos.

Asimismo, El uso de los beneficios que obtiene su hijo no le afecta. (Para más information referirse a la pregunta #8).

Si la prueba de carga pública no se aplica a todos los inmigrantes, ¿cuándo se aplica la prueba de carga pública?

Los funcionarios de inmigración utilizan la prueba de carga pública para decidir si una persona puede venir a los EE. UU. o si una persona puede obtener una tarjeta verde (residente permanente legal o estatus”LPR”) a través de una petición basada en la familia, petición basada en el empleo u otras categorías específicas.

Se aplica cuando un inmigrante está fuera de los Estados Unidos y solicita una visa para visitar o permanecer en los Estados Unidos.

Se aplica cuando un inmigrante ya está dentro de los EE. UU. Y solicita una tarjeta verde (solicitando un ajuste de estatus) generalmente a través de una petición basada en la familia o en el empleo, u otra categoría específica.

¿Qué beneficios públicos considerará el funcionario de inmigración para decidir si una persona puede convertirse en una carga pública?

La prueba de carga pública solo analiza si recibió ciertos beneficios.

Hasta el día 15 de octubre del 2019, la prueba de carga pública revisa si es que un inmigrante recibió alguno de estos beneficios:

  • Programa de asistencia en efectivo para inmigrantes (CAPI)
  • Ingreso de Seguridad Suplementario
  • CalWORKS (TANF)
  • Ayuda General
  • Atención a largo plazo en una institución a cargo del gobierno

Después del 15 de octubre del 2019, la prueba de carga pública revisa si es que un inmigrante recibió alguno de estos beneficios:

  • Programa de asistencia en efectivo para inmigrantes (CAPI)
  • Ingreso de Seguridad Suplementario
  • CalWORKS (TANF)
  • Ayuda General
  • Atención a largo plazo en una institución a cargo del gobierno
  • CalFresh (SNAP)
  • Vivienda Pública

Medi-Cal (Medicaid), EXCEPTO Medi-Cal de emergencia, Medi-Cal financiado por el estado, Medi-Cal para niños menores de 21 años y Medi-Cal para mujeres embarazadas hasta 60 días después del parto

¿Cuáles beneficios públicos NO miran los funcionarios de inmigración para decidir si una persona puede convertirse en una carga pública?

Bajo la nueva regla de carga pública, muchos servicios financiados por el gobierno aún son seguros de usar y no causan ningún perjuicio de inmigración.

Parte D de Medicare- Subsidio para bajos ingresos

Medi-Cal de Emergencia

Programas de Centro de Salud para escala de descuento

My Health LA

CHIP

Uso de Medi-Cal por mujeres embarazadas.

Uso de Medi-Cal por niños hasta los 21 años

Beneficios financiados por el estado bajo PRUCOL

WIC

Desayuno y Almuerzo Escolar

Cuidado de los Niños

Programa de Head Start

Escuela Pública

Beneficios de Cuidado de Crianza

Bancos de Alimentos

Albergues

 

Crédito de Impuesto por Ingreso del Trabajo

Crédito de Impuestos de Vivienda por Bajos Ingresos

Asistencia de FEMA (ayuda por causa de desastre)

Préstamo Estudiantil

Beneficios para veteranos

Desempleo

Compensación para el Trabajador

Beneficios de Retiro (cualquier beneficio de seguro de trabajo)

 

¿El uso de los beneficios públicos que hace mi hijo me afecta?

No. La prueba de carga pública analiza los beneficios que usted usa, no los beneficios que usan sus hijos u otros miembros de la familia. No hay razón para cancelar los beneficios de sus hijos. Sin embargo, si usted tiene ingresos muy bajos, eso es un factor negativo en la prueba de carga pública.

¿Se utilizará en mi contra mi uso anterior de Medi-Cal, CalFresh, Sección 8 o Vivienda Pública?

No. Los beneficios recién agregados a la prueba de carga pública solo se considerarán si se reciben después del 15 de octubre del 2019.

Mantenga la calma. Antes de cancelar cualquier beneficio, usted tiene tiempo para hablar con un abogado de confianza (¡no con un notario!)

¿Puedo ser deportado por usar beneficios públicos?

Muy pocas personas son deportadas por causa de cargos públicos.

Para que el gobierno pueda deportar a alguien basado en un inmigrante que depende de los beneficios públicos, el gobierno tiene que demostrar ante un juez de inmigración lo siguiente:

  • El titular de la tarjeta verde se convirtió en una carga pública dentro de los 5 años de la fecha en que se convirtió en titular de la tarjeta verde, o dentro de los 5 años de la última vez que ingresó a los Estados Unidos, y
  • Se han convertido en una carga pública por razones que existían antes de convertirse en titular de una tarjeta verde.

El gobierno también tiene que demostrarle a un juez de inmigración lo siguiente:

  • Que Esa ley estatal impone un requisito legal de que el inmigrante reembolse al gobierno el costo de los beneficios que recibió,,
  • Que el inmigrante recibió una notificación del gobierno de que él o ella tuvo que devolverle el pago a la agencia dentro de los 5 años posteriores a la fecha en que el inmigrante se convirtió en titular de una tarjeta verde o dentro de los 5 años posteriores a la última vez que ingresó a los Estados Unidos
  • Que el inmigrante no pudo pagar después que el gobierno tomó acciones legales y ganó.
Si solicito beneficios o si mis hijos reciben beneficios, ¿Dará el condado mi información a la policía de inmigración?

No. La información que comparte con el condado es confidencial y solo puede usarse para confirmar la elegibilidad para beneficios públicos. El condado no comparte información personal con la policía de inmigración.

El condado no comparte ninguna información sobre miembros de la familia o del hogar los cuales no soliciten beneficios, y las personas en el hogar que no solicitan beneficios no necesitan compartir su información personal.

¿Hay algo que deba hacer ahora si estoy recibiendo beneficios del gobierno?

Si usted recibe algún beneficio público, usted debe tener cuidado de informar sobre sus ingresos de manera correcta y a tiempo para evitar pagos excesivos y posibles cargos de fraude. Tenga en cuenta el margen de la suma de informes de ingresos (IRT) e informe sus ingresos de inmediato si alcanza esa cantidad, incluso si está entre las fechas de su informe regular. El ser acusado de fraude (no decir la verdad sobre su situación para obtener más beneficios) puede afectar sus opciones de inmigración.

 

Bajo la nueva regla de carga pública, muchos servicios financiados por el gobierno aún son seguros de usar y no causan ningún daño de inmigración

https://www.thelibreproject.org/public-charge.html#screeningtool

Aprenda más en este sitio de web: https://www.nilc.org/issues/economic-support/pubcharge/

Para mayor información o una referencia, usted también puede llamar a nuestra línea telefónica gratuita: 1-800-433-6251

Si usted se encuentra en el condado de Los Ángeles, también puede llamar a la Oficina de Asuntos de Inmigrantes para obtener una referencia a un abogado de inmigración llamando al: 1-800-593-8222

Si usted está interesado en una capacitación institucional de parte del personal de Neighborhood Legal Services para hablar acerca de carga pública, por favor envíe un correo electrónico a:publicchargeproject@nlsla.org